All tagged Textiles and Fashion APPG

Press Release: The All-Party Parliamentary Group for Textiles and Fashion launches Call for Evidence for their policy paper on Representation and Inclusion in the Fashion Industry

“Fashion like politics and indeed the FTSE 250 needs to recognise that inclusion and representation have to be core to systemic change. If businesses and politics are to represent those they serve then we have to see a radical transformation to create a sector which is inclusive and representative of all of us. From the power of the purple pound, to the estimated 60% growth of the modest fashion market to 2021, for businesses to connect with our consumers those in charge need to recognise the need for change in order to be effective and valued in these growing and important markets.” 

Minutes For The APPG For Textiles And Fashion On Retail: The Future Of High Streets And Online Shopping

The APPG for Textiles and Fashion will join policy leaders, retailers, and academics to discuss how to navigate the changing retail environment. The retail sector experienced a harsh 2018, marked by closures, fall in spending and a shift to the online shopping space. Government, media and organisations were quick to respond, with the Housing, Communities and Local Governments Committee launching and concluding an inquiry into the High Streets and Town Centres in 2030

Press Release 21/03/2019: From catwalks to Customs Union, Fashion Roundtable represent the Brexit concerns of the fashion industry

"When we launched Fashion Roundtable the majority of politicians I spoke to thought the industry was just Kate Moss & catwalk shows and were more concerned about fisheries than fashion” Cincik says.“However after contacting each of the 650 MPs highlighting the reality of the UK Fashion Industry’s valuable contribution - generating over 890,000 jobs, nationwide and thousands of jobs and revenue to each of their constituencies - we're now seeing politicians from across the parties, uniting to ensure that our industry maintains its status as a global soft power leader for the economy.”

The Price of Fashion: our exclusive Q&A with the Chair Environmental Audit Committee Mary Creagh MP

What are the three points that you would like Defra to pick up on?

A: It is essential for Defra, and the Government as a whole, to understand that the way we make, use and throwaway our clothes is unsustainable. Our excessive fashion consumption is causing a waste problem both in the UK and overseas.

Defra should make fashion retailers take responsibility for the textile waste they create by introducing an Extended Producer Responsibility scheme for textiles and reward companies that take positive action to reduce waste. The Government’s recent pledge to review and consult on how to deal with textile waste by 2025 is too little too late. We need action before the end of this parliament (2022).  

We would also like to see the Department consider whether it could apply its promised tax on virgin plastics to synthetic garments that don’t contain recycled plastic.  

Defra should also bring together fashion retailers, water companies and washing machine manufacturers to work together to solve the problem of microfibre pollution. We need changes in the law to end the era of throwaway fashion.  

Exclusive Q&A on the High Streets and Town Centres in 2030 report. By Rafaella de Freitas

The High Streets and Town Centres 2030 report was the conclusion of an inquiry led by the Housing, Communities and Local Government Committee of the House of Commons. Town centres and the shopping experience have been reinvented with the next day deliveries, free returns and the comfort on not leaving your house, provided by online stores. This, combined with changing demographics, the trend of moving away from small towns to cities and the domination of chain commerce (how many Costa coffee’s do you walk past on your way to work?) has prompted a massive shift in the usage and scope for town centres and high streets to survive (and thrive )as our shopping habits change.

The Committee’s inquiry sets out to understand the role of high streets and city centres in sustaining social, cultural and economic health to local communities, and to evaluate the impact of the changing high streets on these.

Q&A with Dr Lisa Cameron MP, Chair of the All Party Parliamentary Group For Textiles and Fashion (pictured centre, here with Tamara Cincik and Kelly Tolhurst MP).

Have you seen a shift in perception of the fashion industry among parliamentarians?

Yes, there’s a surprisingly avid interest that I’ve noted amongst cross-party members regarding the fashion and textile industry. Since becoming chair and raising the APPG’s ambitions in Parliament, I’ve found widespread support for these aims across the house. 

Intellectual Property in the Fashion Industry: what risks will come with Brexit? - by Rafaella de Freitas

Intellectual Property (IP) protects a brand, but the panel quickly understood that it is not fully grasped by those who would benefit the most from it - sole traders, micro and SMEs. CEO and Founder of Fashion Roundtable, Tamara Cincik, said: “we have not yet grasped that IP is a brands reputation”. In fashion as well as in any other creative industry, IP is central to the success of the company or brand, which by its very nature is dependent on its unique image. The originality of a design is what makes it stand out as exceptional and desirable from other collections, and ultimately, what defines the brand. As part of the EU, brands showcasing their collections in the UK for the first time are protected under the unregistered design right. However, in the midst of Brexit, designers wanting to launch their collections in the UK will have to find other ways to protect their creations.

Dr Lisa Cameron: Chair of the APPG for Textiles And Fashion On Passporting Rights Post Brexit

Dr Cameron MP: “To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, if he will take steps as part of the negotiations for the UK leaving the EU to seek the creation of a visa system between the UK and EU countries to meet the needs of the creative sector.
A Answered by: Caroline Nokes Answered on: 09 July 2018
The Government is considering a range of options for the future immigration system. We will​ ​build​ ​a​ ​comprehensive​ ​picture​ ​of​ ​the​ ​needs​ ​and​ ​interests​ ​of​ ​all​ ​parts​ ​of​ ​the​ ​UK, including​ ​different​ ​sectors,​ ​businesses​ ​and​ ​communities,​ ​and​ ​look​ ​to​ ​develop​ ​a system​ ​that​ ​works​ ​for​ ​all.​
We will make decisions on the future immigration system based on evidence and engagement. That is why we have asked the independent Migration Advisory Committee to advise on the economic and social impacts of the UK’s exit from the EU. When building the new system, various aspects including the creative sector will be taken into account, to ensure the future immigration system works for sectors.
We will set out proposals later this year.”

John Lewis Set To Rebrand By Sophie Dyer.

It is widely acknowledged that the retail sector is going through a period of generational change and every retailer’s response will be different. For the partnership, the focus is on greater differentiation – not scale,” A spokesperson for John Lewis said in a recent statement.

Press Release for The Power of Influence Fashion Roundtable Event at The Shop At Bluebird Covent Garden

“I am thrilled to be bringing a Fashion Roundtable event to the magical new The Shop at Bluebird in Floral Street. It’s a beautiful store, celebrating great fashion and style with a witty approach. Like many fashionistas, I worked hard to get a seat on the Front Row at catwalk shows; but what is also relevant is what we can do with that voice once we have achieved that influence. It’s one thing getting there, it’s another using it. That’s why I am so pleased to have these incredible speakers on board, all of whom have used their platforms to promote positive change. Am excited to share this event with you!”

Fashion Roundtable Despatch April 2018

“If we have learnt anything from these elections then, it is that politics needs some disruption, an alteration to the status quo. If we do not stand up and allow our voice to be heard, we can be confident that the outcome from Brexit, will unlikely be in the form we wish.”

After the local elections, what do voters think about Brexit now?

Inside Parliament

Westminster Debate

Scottish Fashion

Observations: Eszter Kantor - Division and Debate - Brexit and Trade

Fashion Roundtable In Conversation for SHOWstudio

Fashion Revolution #whomademyclothes

Fashion Roundtable Despatch March 2018

"Fishing delivers roughly £1.9bn to the UK economy, compared to fashion’s £29.7bn. Nonetheless, fashion is yet to have a debate dedicated to the industry, in the House of Commons, in two years. Which means fashion has not been debated during the entire EU referendum process. As aforementioned, fashion did have a debate in the Lords but it only lasted 8 minutes. Fishing, this month, had a debate dedicated to the subject in the Commons and it lasted almost an hour."

Trade Wars – The Threat of Isolationism is Beyond Political Rhetoric

Inside Parliament

Fashion mentioned for 8 minutes in a House of Lords debate.

Intellectual Property

Seasonal Migrant Workers

The Fisheries

Observations: Navjyot Lehl - Division and Debate - What Has Happened in Brexit and Where Are We Now?

APPG For Textiles and Fashion Meeting at the Houses of Parliament: Fashion Trade with China.

Fashion Roundtable Despatch February 2018

Eszter Kantor: Brussels View On Brexit

Inside Parliament

Cars Versus Fashion

Gender Pay Gap

100 Years of Women's Suffrage

Observations: Eszter Kantor: US Denim - Division and Debate

Populism in Italy

Commonwealth Fashion Exchange at Buckingham Palace

HM The Queen Attends LFW