All tagged sustainable fashion

The Price of Fashion: our exclusive Q&A with the Chair Environmental Audit Committee Mary Creagh MP

What are the three points that you would like Defra to pick up on?

A: It is essential for Defra, and the Government as a whole, to understand that the way we make, use and throwaway our clothes is unsustainable. Our excessive fashion consumption is causing a waste problem both in the UK and overseas.

Defra should make fashion retailers take responsibility for the textile waste they create by introducing an Extended Producer Responsibility scheme for textiles and reward companies that take positive action to reduce waste. The Government’s recent pledge to review and consult on how to deal with textile waste by 2025 is too little too late. We need action before the end of this parliament (2022).  

We would also like to see the Department consider whether it could apply its promised tax on virgin plastics to synthetic garments that don’t contain recycled plastic.  

Defra should also bring together fashion retailers, water companies and washing machine manufacturers to work together to solve the problem of microfibre pollution. We need changes in the law to end the era of throwaway fashion.  

More or Less Magazine x Matchesfashion: Designers Work Wonders With Waste. An Op-Ed by Trash4gold

It was refreshing to see designers featured that don’t have sustainability at the core of their brand. Vital conversations about waste are being opened up. Louise Gray made a splendid patch worked dress whereby strands of trimmings were attached in layers. Halpern used various fabrics from past seasons, creating a mish-mashed version of his signature sequin all in ones and Richard Quinn created a red floral dress using spare sample fabric. While Dilara Findikolu used old toiles creating a Miss Havishamesque gown with an embroidered D on the neckline.

Fashion Accelerators - The Catalyst for Innovation & Sustainability in the Fashion Industry. An Op-Ed by Amy Nguyen

The fashion landscape is a rich tapestry of innovation saturated with revolutionary ideas that have the potential to propagate sustainability. Innovations today are the solutions of tomorrow. These innovations could be in raw materials, dyeing and finishing processes, manufacturing, retail strategies, end of use practices as well as transparency and traceability. Fashion accelerators are at the crux of providing a crucial platform for these innovations to drive value, whether it be economic, environmental or social to tackle the increasingly urgent issues of sustainability facing the industry. This may be mitigating social inequalities dispersed throughout global value chains or curbing devastation to the earths eco systems and biodiversity in order to ensure a safer operating space for current and future generations.

From The Factory Floor: Founder & CEO Of Fashion - Enter Jenny Holloway Responds To The Environment Audit Committee Report.

The EAC report is also wrong on the point that "Short lead times means that wash tests and wearer trials are often not feasible, with implications for garment quality". This is nonsense. Every single fabric has to be tested and approved. We make up to 10,000 garments a week and we have had to test every single fabric and if it fails the tests then quite simply we can’t use them.

Fashion Is Fabulous, But It’s Not Much Use If We’ve Nowhere To Live. An op-ed by Clare Press

Find me a fashion designer who hasn’t looked to Nature for inspiration, whether literally referencing flowers, trees, the oceans, the rainforests, animals, feathers or only the colours and moods of the wild or the weather. Bet you can’t, because our natural world is the source of the greatest, most diverse, most magical, spine-tingling beauty. It’s not just our home, but the source of all life. Including ours. We’d do well to remember this with every breath we take, because seriously, we’re trashing the joint. 

The PR move that left Boohoo looking sheepish. An op-ed by Eleanor O'Leary

Last Friday afternoon, the press was abuzz with news that Boohoo had plans to implement a ‘wool ban’.

In a statement that seems to use the word ‘knowingly’ to suspicious effect, the brand announced that “as of AW19/20, we will not knowingly source any wool products”. PETA’s Director of Corporate Projects, Yvonne Taylor stated “PETA is toasting boohoo group's compassionate, business-savvy decision to scrap wool. Kind shoppers agree that no jumper or scarf is worth kicking, punching, and killing gentle sheep on the shearing floor, and we're urging other retailers to follow boohoo's forward-thinking example.”

From a brand that was declared as “failing to commit” by the Environmental Audit Committee in its recent investigation of British fashion brands, this move would be considered a real step in the right direction, yes?

The Future is Bright for Fashion at 8Future Fabrics Expo. An Op-Ed by Fiona Carter

In the depths of the basement of Victoria House, Bloomsbury Square a fabric revolution is on the rise. This year sees the 8th Future Fabrics Expo move into their new 22,000 sq ft of space, having outgrown their original show space in the Eco complex Iris Studios in South West London. Future Fabrics Expo is curated by The Sustainable Angle,  a Swiss not-for-profit organisation founded and run by Nina Marenzi.  Starting in her native Switzerland in 2011, she has now made London her home because of the size and creative nature of the UK fashion market. The Sustainable Angle provides a conduit that brings manufacturers, consumers and designers together to seek best outcomes and practice through innovation and sustainability.

Is Fashion Finally Squaring The Circle? By Tamara Cincik

On Friday I attended the breakfast launch to Disrupting Patterns at Chelsea College of Art, to celebrate a two year project by designer Filippa K in collaboration with Mistra Future Fashion as well as Professor Rebecca Earley & Dr. Kate Goldsworthy from the Centre for Circular Design at  UAL. "Circular Design Speeds" is a collection using the latest methods in innovation for production, the highlight of which is a dress which is 100%  bio-based and biodegradable, after wearing it several times, you can compost it and it will fully decompose.The "Throw Away Dress" is created with non-woven Tencel material that avoids the costly processes of spinning and weaving, before being naturally dyed using food by Heart and Earth Production. Another highlight was "The Eternal Trench Coat" that is 100% recycled using polyester from plastic bottles. The dyeing process used also reduces water usage by 75 % and chemical usage by 90%. The coat is available at Filippa K stores and online.

#LoveNotLandfill: Why vintage and pre-loved clothing is your answer to shopping more sustainably. By Lottie Jackson

Within an article for Man Repeller last week, fashion journalist Pandora Sykes spoke about bringing a newfound eco-consciousness into her sartorial choices. Whilst admitting she is still not immune to the “new in” sections, her latest rule is ‘if I see something new that I like, I have to see if I can find the vintage version of it first.’ Now surely this is something all consumers could introduce into their mind-set? This weekend Fashion Roundtable hosted an event at The Festival of Sustainable Fashion to discuss fashion waste and the viable options to counteract its polluting impact. While Rafaella de Freitas covered the local, national and international governmental policies to combat waste, Jodi Muter-Hamilton offered tech solutions which could aid transparency and thereby reducing the cost and excess of overconsumption. Also speaking during the event, JJ Hudson aka Noki said: ‘the fast fashion brand is creating weapons of mass production, Brandalism is a solution. My practice as a solo customiser selling a custom built collection could be classed as a micro footprint in sustainability to create for a consumer.’

Q&A with Alice Potts, The RCA Graduate And Material Researcher Proving How Our Excreta Is The Future Of Sustainability In Fashion, By Lottie Jackson

For me fashion has always had a key opportunity to create a more sustainable future because it’s the closest thing we wear to our bodies without us realising, becoming our second skin. Personally, I believe that our bodies are our greatest technologies. I looked at how we could use secretion to form second skins as well as natural health indicators. Not only does the industry need to change, but we also need to transform the way the consumer shops and thinks about clothing. One of the biggest issues is over-consumption, so by trying to prolong garments that can grow and change with us I hope to expand their life-span. 

From McKinsey Analyst To Kashmiri Goat Herd: Babar Afzal. Op-Ed By Florence Raqa.

The lessons learnt result in a NFP where luxury, sustainability and artisanal values meet. From the community whose fragile economy is based on the survival of the pashmina goat, in a location currently deeply divided with internecine conflicts, to an eco-system which creates a cashmere wool so fine that it literally defines luxury, all in remote mountains hit by the severe impacts of climate change, Babar is working to protect and safeguard these communities and supply chains. 

Anti-fast fashion activist DR NOKI brings his own brand of sustainable luxe to MATCHESFASHION.com Innovators Platform. By Lottie Jackson.

Of his design process, NOKI reveals “I see vintage garments as spare parts much like a car customiser sees their futuristic vehicle builds. My clients are also very similar, they know they are receiving something unique and are very willing to pay those luxury prices to get their hands on NOKI. They just trust me to create and it’s a privilege to be trusted like this.”

Continuing his long-held status as a pioneer, NOKI’s latest designs signal a new age of sustainability for the luxury fashion market- where the domains of haute couture artistry and sustainability may seamlessly intersect.

Single Use Plastic: Does Brexit Mean Brexit For The UK As The EU Commits To Plastic Reduction By 2021? By Rafaella De Freitas and Tamara Cincik

This is what we at Fashion Roundtable will be advocating for post-Brexit: a UK fashion industry which continues to lead in the exciting space where craft, artisan and ethical FashionTech coalesce into a transparent and truly sustainable fashion industry. We have to ensure that leaving the EU does not mean deregulation. We need a future vision where the UK is not an isolated island drowning in a pool of plastic and instead showcase one where any plastic we do create is reused to make something relevant and long-lasting, be that a shoe, a sock, or even a red carpet dress.

Everything You Need To Know About Circular Fashion And The Companies Disrupting The Fast Fashion Model - by Lottie Jackson

#OOTD a single hashtag with a lot of baggage. Instagram’s “outfit of the day” phenomenon has fuelled a whole culture, resulting in the pressure to consume fashion in a way that is instant, performative and transient. At the same time documentaries such as The True Cost and Fashion's Dirty Secrets, revealing the human and environmental cost of the fashion industry, have left viewers feeling overwhelmed by the scale of damage wrought by clothing manufacturing. This has resulted in a disconnect between our growing awareness of how damaging our shopping habits have become and the desire to fill our wardrobes at any cost.

What does Brexit Mean for Progress? - Tamara Cincik for Eco-Age

Brexit is the defining issue for this generation within the UK. Whether you voted Remain or Leave in the EU Referendum in 2016, for the fashion industry (which voted 96% Remain; is worth more than £29.7 billion to the UK economy; and depends upon a globally-interconnected international supply chain), it raises significant questions - from deregulation of labour markets, to trading and employment rights. Tamara Cincik, CEO and Founder of Fashion Roundtable, which launched last November to create a much-needed conversation between fashion, business, consumers and policy leaders, points out the main risk factors to consider - Deal or No Deal.

Why Sustainable Fashion Has To Be A Global Conversation - by Tamara Cincik

Fashion Roundtable submitted a response to the Parliamentary Inquiry on the Sustainability of the fashion industry, for the Environmental Audit Committee chaired by Mary Creagh MP. This “investigates the social and environmental impact of disposable ‘fast fashion’ and the wider clothing industry. The inquiry examines the carbon, resource use and water footprint of clothing throughout its lifecycle. It will look at how clothes can be recycled, and waste and pollution reduced.” 

Teatum Jones: Round Table not Runway

Finalists in the 2018 Green Carpet Franca Sozzani emerging designer Award, International Woolmark Prize and British Fashion Trust Winners Teatum Jones, have just been appointed by the BFC as the 'Positive Fashion’ representatives for London Fashion Week Spring Summer 2019. This season Teatum Jones have partnered with Youtube, Google and The British Fashion Council in support of United Nations Women for their latest collection ‘Global Womanhood Part Two, 16 Days Of Activism.’

FR Event Success: Body Image and Identity Politics

Last Wednesday Fashion Roundtable partnered with The Hox Holborn for our Body Image and Identity Politics Event. The panel, chaired by Tamara Cincik and featuring Caryn Franklin MBE, Farrah Storr Editor of Cosmopolitan, Chidera Eggerue intersectional feminist and founder of #saggyboobsmatter, Jules Von Hep celebrity spray tanner and body positivity advocate, Grace Woodward TV presenter and stylist and Jacob Mallison Bird Drag artist, model and Oxford PHD student, discussed identity and body positive body image with a focus on inclusion, diversity and representation.